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  Reporters take pictures during clashes between protesters and police in Kiev, on January 22, 2014. (AP Photo/Efrem Lukatsky)


There is some amazing photography on that page (and on the Atlantic In Focus site always). But, like, look at that journalist with the colander on his head, taking snaps with his phone. That is insane. The riot police behind him? People are shooting at each other and throwing molotov cocktails back and forth.

After you reflect on all that, read this Foreign Policy piece on kidnapped journalists and how that’s terrible.

Reporters take pictures during clashes between protesters and police in Kiev, on January 22, 2014. (AP Photo/Efrem Lukatsky)

There is some amazing photography on that page (and on the Atlantic In Focus site always). But, like, look at that journalist with the colander on his head, taking snaps with his phone. That is insane. The riot police behind him? People are shooting at each other and throwing molotov cocktails back and forth.

After you reflect on all that, read this Foreign Policy piece on kidnapped journalists and how that’s terrible.

Because Syria is no longer Syria. It is a nuthouse. There is the Italian guy who was unemployed and joined al-Qaeda, and whose mom is hunting for him around Aleppo to give him a good beating; there is the Japanese tourist who is on the frontlines, because he says he needs two weeks of “thrills”; the Swedish law-school graduate who came to collect evidence of war crimes; the American musicians with bin Laden-style beards who insist this helps them blend in, even though they are blonde and six-feet, five-inches tall. (They brought malaria drugs, even if there’s no malaria here, and want to deliver them while playing violin.) There are the various officers of the various UN agencies who, when you tell them you know of a child with leishmaniasis (a disease spread by the bite of a sand fly) and could they help his parents get him to Turkey for treatment, say they can’t because it is but a single child, and they only deal with “childhood” as a whole.

This piece, “Woman’s work: The twisted reality of an Italian freelancer in Syria” by Francesca Borri is incredible. The paragraph following the above grounds the extraordinary in the terribly mundane:

But we’re war reporters, after all, aren’t we? A band of brothers (and sisters). We risk our lives to give voice to the voiceless. We have seen things most people will never see. We are a wealth of stories at the dinner table, the cool guests who everyone wants to invite. But the dirty secret is that instead of being united, we are our own worst enemies; and the reason for the $70 per piece isn’t that there isn’t any money, because there is always money for a piece on Berlusconi’s girlfriends. The true reason is that you ask for $100 and somebody else is ready to do it for $70. It’s the fiercest competition. Like Beatriz, who today pointed me in the wrong direction so she would be the only one to cover the demonstration, and I found myself amid the snipers as a result of her deception. Just to cover a demonstration, like hundreds of others.

Not that I’m not largely a fan of The Electric Typewriter… but their “War” reading list was written entirely by men.

thepoliticalnotebook:

In the interest of making sure that folks know that not only have women written longform journalism about war, but they’ve done it well — here are some possible additions to the list in an attempt to add some gender balance. (Here is TETW’s original list, which indeed includes long-form articles highly worth reading…)

Looks worthwhile.

Pretty sure that’s not why “bloggers are dumb”, though if the cure for cancer could be found in pageview generation then yes it would be (maybe) a bad allocation of resources to cover stories that are only interesting to yourself.

Given the reins to the godhead blog CMS, I know I could only muster the stuff to write (ahem) report about Gay Obama.

And we all know how music journalists are heavily invested in optimal allocation of resources. Definitely only write about “Ricky Gervais 2012 Golden Globes Opening Monologue”, “Pe Lanza leva pedrada na cabeça em show! (Rio das”, and “Champion Spotlight - Sejuani, the Winter’s Wrath” or else you may become instantly irrelevant and/or a plague on humanity.

Which is it? Bloggers are doing themselves a disservice because the thing they’re writing about isn’t popular enough -or- they’re bloviating pageview grabbers because they jump on the meme train? Allow me to destroy your mind: some people were writing about her video before she even had video. That’s a heavily zen form of blogging.

My advice: write about what you want, do a good job, and try to make yourself happy.

Pretty sure that’s not why “bloggers are dumb”, though if the cure for cancer could be found in pageview generation then yes it would be (maybe) a bad allocation of resources to cover stories that are only interesting to yourself.

Given the reins to the godhead blog CMS, I know I could only muster the stuff to write (ahem) report about Gay Obama.

And we all know how music journalists are heavily invested in optimal allocation of resources. Definitely only write about “Ricky Gervais 2012 Golden Globes Opening Monologue”, “Pe Lanza leva pedrada na cabeça em show! (Rio das”, and “Champion Spotlight - Sejuani, the Winter’s Wrath” or else you may become instantly irrelevant and/or a plague on humanity.

Which is it? Bloggers are doing themselves a disservice because the thing they’re writing about isn’t popular enough -or- they’re bloviating pageview grabbers because they jump on the meme train? Allow me to destroy your mind: some people were writing about her video before she even had video. That’s a heavily zen form of blogging.

My advice: write about what you want, do a good job, and try to make yourself happy.